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2 Conservation Easement Groups Split on Antiabuse Legislation

Tax Notes
By: Fred Stokeld
May 9, 2018

Legislation to prevent abuse of a popular tax break for land donations is being hailed by a land conservation organization as a solution but criticized as misguided by another conservation group…

…There has been no action on H.R. 4459 or S. 2436 since they were introduced. Faeth said IRS reform bills currently before Congress would be good vehicles for the legislation.

But Randy Bampfield of the Partnership for Conservation, which was established to encourage private sector participation in land conservation, says the legislation does not address the underlying problem: valuation.

“To the extent that there are any challenges with respect to conservation easement donations, the problem is always in the valuation, in the appraisal,” Bampfield told Tax Analysts. “This legislation does nothing to look at the underlying appraisal to judge whether or not it is accurate and correctly done. It simply eliminates a certain class of donation regardless of the actual economic realities of the transaction and just casts them aside and says these are not permissible.”

Bampfield, a member of the IRS Conservation Easement Issue Management Team when he worked in the IRS Office of Chief Counsel, said the Partnership for Conservation is working on legislative proposals to enhance appraisal requirements…

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At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!

At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!Social distancing means avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible. While we're at it, let's remember to keep it 300 feet or more for larger wildlife.

As services are limited, the National Park Service continues to urge visitors to:

Check park websites for the most up to date information regarding access.

Pack out everything you bring into a park and always practice Leave No Trace principles.

Park only in designated areas. Follow park regulations.

If you encounter a crowded trail-head or overlook, you're not practicing safe social distancing. Go elsewhere.

If waving to your friend from six feet away, you're doing it right. If you're waving while standing next to a moose, you're not.

Visit nps.gov/coronavirus to learn more.
#SocialDistancing #KeepWildlifeWild
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