7/26

“Abusive Tax Shelters” or Abuse of Taxpayers? IRS Should Learn Difference

National Taxpayers Union
By Pete Sepp
July 26, 2018

It may not have made headlines in the mainstream media, but many in the tax-administration world took notice on Friday when a few findings leaked from an Internal Revenue Service claim that certain taxpayers who had deductions for “syndicated conservation easements” were receiving massive, unwarranted windfalls. Over the weekend NTU had the opportunity to review what was made available at the request of Members of the Senate Finance Committee, and added to what we’ve long known, we believe taxpayers should take greater note of this seemingly obscure issue. The IRS’s claim appears to be emblematic of the way the tax agency too often uses blunt tools for jobs that need refined instruments.

Here at NTU, we have a history of looking deeply into the administrative machinery of the tax system and figuring out how its gears can function more smoothly without grinding up taxpayers’ rights in the process. We have submitted comments on IRS rules ranging from family estate valuations for tax purposes to the use of outside counsel in audit situations. We’ve also made detailed recommendations on how to prevent the IRS from using extraordinary powers such as the designated summons or designating cases for litigation, which if misapplied can stamp out legitimate taxpayer rights to appeal audit results. It was during research on the latter problem several months ago that we first encountered a curious decision by the tax agency.

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At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!

At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!Social distancing means avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible. While we're at it, let's remember to keep it 300 feet or more for larger wildlife.

As services are limited, the National Park Service continues to urge visitors to:

Check park websites for the most up to date information regarding access.

Pack out everything you bring into a park and always practice Leave No Trace principles.

Park only in designated areas. Follow park regulations.

If you encounter a crowded trail-head or overlook, you're not practicing safe social distancing. Go elsewhere.

If waving to your friend from six feet away, you're doing it right. If you're waving while standing next to a moose, you're not.

Visit nps.gov/coronavirus to learn more.
#SocialDistancing #KeepWildlifeWild
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