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Conservation partnerships are helping to protect farmland from development

High Plains/Midwest Ag Journal
By: George Thornton
June 11, 2018

If you take a trip through rural America, you will pass one farm after another that produces an abundance of food to feed both America and the world while supporting millions of jobs. These farms also serve as habitat for wildlife, including approximately half of our country’s protected species.

Family farms remain an integral part of the U.S. agricultural sector. However, due to rising costs, big farms getting bigger, and encroaching development, far too many family farms are being lost. In fact, more than 40 acres of farm and ranch land is lost hourly to development, or nearly 1,000 acres every day.

One solution is increased use of conservation easements, a vital instrument in protecting land for future use. Individuals, families or partnerships of unrelated individuals can enter into conservation easements, which are voluntary and legally-binding agreements, to protect lands from future development while allowing the continuation of activities like farming…

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At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!

At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!Social distancing means avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible. While we're at it, let's remember to keep it 300 feet or more for larger wildlife.

As services are limited, the National Park Service continues to urge visitors to:

Check park websites for the most up to date information regarding access.

Pack out everything you bring into a park and always practice Leave No Trace principles.

Park only in designated areas. Follow park regulations.

If you encounter a crowded trail-head or overlook, you're not practicing safe social distancing. Go elsewhere.

If waving to your friend from six feet away, you're doing it right. If you're waving while standing next to a moose, you're not.

Visit nps.gov/coronavirus to learn more.
#SocialDistancing #KeepWildlifeWild
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