6/18

A look into conservation easement appraisals

Valuation Review
By Luke Von Esh
June 18, 2018

Conservation easement appraisals provide many benefits to the public. But the short supply of public conservation easement funding may mean their future is limited. Luke Von Esh, a Georgia appraiser with many years of experience under his belt, says while federal, state, and local governments often take the lead on conservation efforts and help purchase important lands, government conservation programs are limited and inadequately funded. To promote more conservation and protect sensitive lands, Congress has incentivized the charitable donation of a conservation easement.

Von Esh started performing these conservation easement appraisals in 2009, and as he got more and more comfortable writing these up, he was asked to do more. This area of appraising became his niche, as he put it. But Von Esh is concerned that conservation easements won’t be available to every property owner in the future.

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At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!

At P4C, our mission is to expand conservation easements to keep pace with the continuous need for land conservation and wildlife preservation. More protected land means we can keep a safe 300 feet from larger wildlife!Social distancing means avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet) from others when possible. While we're at it, let's remember to keep it 300 feet or more for larger wildlife.

As services are limited, the National Park Service continues to urge visitors to:

Check park websites for the most up to date information regarding access.

Pack out everything you bring into a park and always practice Leave No Trace principles.

Park only in designated areas. Follow park regulations.

If you encounter a crowded trail-head or overlook, you're not practicing safe social distancing. Go elsewhere.

If waving to your friend from six feet away, you're doing it right. If you're waving while standing next to a moose, you're not.

Visit nps.gov/coronavirus to learn more.
#SocialDistancing #KeepWildlifeWild
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